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Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG)


Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgeries are among the most commonly performed major operations. CABG surgery is advised for selected groups of patients with significant narrowings and blockages of the heart arteries (coronary artery disease). CABG surgery creates new routes around narrowed and blocked arteries, allowing sufficient blood flow to deliver oxygen and nutrients to the heart muscle.


Dr. Dhairyasheel Kanase (Director, Apex Super Specialty Clinic) is very experienced Cardiac Surgeon and has performed several Cardiac Surgeries at various hospitals in Pune like K.E.M. Hospital, Poona Hospital and Research centre, N. M. Wadia Hospital of Cardiology, Ruby Hall Clinic, Jehangir Hospital and Deenanath Mangeshkar Hospital as Consultant Cardiac Surgeon.

Coronary bypass surgery is a procedure that restores blood flow to your heart muscle by diverting the flow of blood around a section of a blocked artery in your heart. Coronary bypass surgery uses a healthy blood vessel taken from your leg, arm, chest or abdomen and connects it to the other arteries in your heart so that blood is bypassed around the diseased or blocked area. After a coronary bypass surgery, blood flow to your heart is improved. Coronary bypass surgery is just one option to treat heart disease. Coronary artery disease develops because of hardening of the arteries(arteriosclerosis) that supply blood to the heart muscle.


How does coronary artery disease develop?

Coronary artery disease (CAD) occurs when atherosclerotic plaque (hardening of the arteries) builds up in the wall of the arteries that supply the heart. This plaque is primarily made of cholesterol. Plaque accumulation can be accelerated by smoking, high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, and diabetes. Patients are also at higher risk for plaque development if they are older (greater than 45 years for men and 55 years for women), or if they have a positive family history for early heart artery disease.



How Surgery is performed?

During traditional heart bypass surgery, a surgeon makes an incision (about 6 to 8 inches) down the center of your sternum (breastbone) to get direct access to your heart. You are connected to a heart-lung bypass machine (called "on-pump" surgery), which allows for circulation of blood throughout your body during surgery. The heart is stopped and the surgeon then performs the bypass procedure described above. The heart is generally stopped for about 30-90 minutes of the 4-5 hour surgery.

After surgery, the surgeon closes the breastbone with special sternal wires and the chest with special internal or traditional external stitches.